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BELÉN

 

Philosophy

BELÉN designs from material. By broadening and expanding the material qualities of spaces, objects and products, BELÉN creates tangible design for the future. Central to their approach are the intuitive, emotional and physical aspects of design, resulting in products and visions that show unexpected applications of material and colours, as well as revaluations of conventional techniques. BELÉN works on material and colour concepts in the field of product design, interior design and exhibition design.

They have been commissioned by Georg Jensen, Villa Noailles Hyères, Textiellab Tilburg, amongst others.

Their work has been exhibited at Textile Museum Tilburg, Boijmans van Beuningen Rotterdam, Palazzo Clerici Milano.

 

Who

BELÉN is established by Brecht Duijf and Lenneke Langenhuijsen, who met each other at the Design Academy Eindhoven, the Netherlands.

After graduating cum laude at the Design Academy Eindhoven, Brecht started to work as part-time designer for Forbo Flooring. After a few years of free-lance designer she established her garment label 18-11-81 (www.18-11-81.com) in 2014. In 2010 she won a Calvijn Classiscs awards, in 2012 her business was funded by BKVB. 

Lenneke graduated cum laude at the Design Academy Eindhoven with her project Wooden Textiles. This project is professionalized and established in 2014. Now known as Cambials (www.cambials.com). Lenneke was one of the finalists in the Doen Material Prize in 2011, the Green Design Competition in 2012 and won Open Design Italia in 2013. 

Together, Brecht and Lenneke received a subsidy form the DOEN Foundation for 'creative sustainable entrepreneurs'.

Currently they are teaching at Design Academy Eindhoven and Artemis Akademie Amsterdam.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Elektronstraat 12-14 space 35

1014 AP Amsterdam

 

Brecht +31 (0) 630022877  

Lenneke +31 (0) 681673232 

 

Brecht Duijf

Chamber of commerce no.34304094

VAT no. NL174633531B01

 

Studio Lenneke Langenhuijsen

Chamber of commerce no. 52263150

VAT no. NL069522595B01

 

 

NS

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Perspective for the Dutch Railway more info
 

 

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Client: NS (Dutch Railway)     Year: 2016     For the Dutch Railway (NS) BELéN developed a perspective on the future train. What if all cars are electric and drive themselves? You don't need to take the train to spare emission or to be able to work. So what will be the future reason to take the train? A big difference between a car and a train is the size. The train has a human size but then stretched. Because of this you have the possibility to change atmosphere through the train. This makes it possible to chose a different scene every time you travel. One that fits your mood. And you share a same kind of mood with your fellow travellers. In a deep dark space you extend your night and dive in a book or sleep a bit. In a bright exciting sphere you might be open for a talk. A grey space with many different textures is colourise neutral but maybe stimulate thoughts. Maybe this is the right place to have a meeting. Different materials, colours, textures, appeal to different moods.     Credits: Concept and Design: buroBELéN Execution: Jantien Roozenburg Photography and Film: Nieuw en Verbeterd    

Flaxities

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Flax table-cloth and Flax Napkins by Christien Meindertsma, setting by BELéN
 

Extending flax's appearances more info
 

Flax Rug by Christien Meinderstma, Couch Cover, One-Thread Hammock and Oiled Cape by BELéN
 

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Client: Zuiderzee Museum on behalf of Jules van den Langenberg       Year: 2016       Iconic Dutch Design is recontexualized by a younger generation in the jubilee exhibition of contemporary design publisher Thomas Eyck. In collaboration with Zuiderzee Museum and curator Jules van den Langenberg this section is first to publish a series of new projects.   Flax is an ‘old’ material with a rich history. Buro BELÉN builds on designer Christien Meindertsma’s flax items, which are also on display in this installation and show that flax will continue to be very much at home in the future. BELÉN focuses on the rich tactility of flax. The designers developed the ‘Oiled cape’, a rain cape made using linseed oil, which is derived from flax. They used traditionally-made bell rope to knit the ‘One thread hammock’, a hammock made of a single long thread. They also developed a ‘Combed couch cover’ of woven linen, another flax product, and roughened the fabric to give it a soft texture. To finish there is a ‘Go through’: a huge wall, which is also a passage, made of hairy, strokeable flax.       Buro BELÉN reflect on a serie of Christien Meindertsma. Designer Christien Meindertsma explores the life and origins of objects and materials. She uses these to portray production methods which industrialisation has pushed into the background. In 2009 Thomas Eyck commissioned her to design a series of utensils made of flax, ‘Flax Project’, which consists of a flax candle, tea-towels, napkins, a tablecloth, chair, rug, pouffe, three types of hanging lamps, and an extension cord. The items are made by Touwslagerij Steenbergen in Gorssel, where rope has been hand-made from natural materials such as hemp and flax since 1900. Lelystad carpentry business Kuperus & Gardenier manufactures the wooden components of this series.     Credits: Concept and Design: BELéN reacted on Christien Meindertsma. Both worlds are merged in this exhibition. Curation: Jules van den Langenberg Execution: Touwslagerij Steenbergen, Zuiderzee Museum, BELéN Thank you: Jules van den Langenberg, Thomas Eyck and Christien Meindertsma

Living Interior

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short film more info
 

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Project: Living Interior Year: 2016     In search for the perfect decor of human being. What if a space lives in relation with you? A play with time and light through colour and texture.    Credits: Concept and Art-direction: buroBELÉN Design, Modelmaking, Photography: Jantien Roozenburg Editing: Corlieske Visser   Thank you: Ophir Sela, Vitra, Z33

living colours walls

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Merging Wallpaper in collaboration with AGA more info
 

Living Textures in collaboration with Cottonmix
 

 

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Merging Wallpaper by AGA x Paintingplants.nl x buroBELÉN     Everyone knows a common colourchart, but what happens to colours over time? Just like all other colours, vegetable colours undergo changes as a result of light and other external factors. This discoloration has been captured on the De-colourchart, which allows designers to use this process to their advantage and incorporate discoloration into their design. This wallpaper is developed from the De-colourchart. It offers us a glimpse of the future, and with it, the possibility to design something that becomes even more beautiful over time. Wallpaper always has a repeating pattern, which is most of the time immediately apparent. These three types of wallpaper break up the regularity through pattern and colour-use. As a result colours and patterns take over the wall and they will change over time.           Living Textures by Cottonmix x Rigo x Rubia x buroBELÉN   Cottonmix is a cotton-based plaster used for (acoustic) finishing walls and ceilings. Paint containing vegetable colorant from Rubia has been incorporated into a Rigo natural paint base. Cottonmix can be produced in various textures. Spraying a wall with it from various angles creates a unique colour depth. The wall will appear almost luminous from certain angles, while from others the rough texture might create countless shadows.        

living colours textiles

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Laying Bag in collaboration with Febrik
 

Another Blanket
 

Another Blanket in collaboration with Textiellab more info
 

Fluffed in collaboration with Textiellab
 

 

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Another Plaid by Textiellab x Rubia x buroBELÉN   Not fully completing the staining process and dyeing in a machine that has not been rinsed, saves us both water and dye. A single wool bobbin will be turned into a single plaid with its own unique colour pattern and markings. The merino wool plaid shows plenty of contrast and clear markings. It incorporates a range of colours. A more fluffy yarn, like mohair makes the version decidedly less full of contrast, instead creating an interplay of dark shades.     Laying Bag by Febrik x Rubia x Masureel x buroBELÉN     The Laying Bag matches smart production to the wonderful relief that makes Febrik textiles so unique. The Febrik machine weaves cylindrical fabrics, which can be cut open and used for upholstery and in other applications. However, the designers have decided to use the machine as a kind of 3D printer that gives the product its shape as it produces the material. Thanks to the natural dye, the pale pink Laying Bag will slowly turn pale yellow over time while the deep folds will remain pale pink. This will highlight the relief that characterises Febrik textiles.      Fluffed by Textiellab x Rubia x buroBELÉN     This thick woollen rug slowly turns from pale pink to pale yellow through light. Only the surface changes colour. The space in between the tufts will remain pink this brings a sense of depth to the rug. This means a hue of pink will always remain visible when you walk over or sit on it. As traces of the interior will become visible and leave a colour variation over time. 

living colours

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Presentation of 'Living Colours' at Van Abbemuseum during DDW more info
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Client: AVANS Hogescholen Year: 2015     Colours are determining factors for our interior. We do our very best to choose the right colours and conserve them. But in nature, colours are never the same. Research shows that natural colours in our living surroundings have a positive influence on our wellbeing. With the ‘Time will change’ exhibition, a collective composed of researchers, manufacturers and designers demonstrates the positive impact of changing, natural and living colours on interior design.   We developed a de-colour chart that shows how certain colours develop over time. This is demonstrated in a wallpaper that changes in colour depending on the light intensity, living walls with textures and natural dyes and a collection of textile products such as upholstery fabric, rugs and plaids that show the potency and strength of discolouring and irregularities of natural colours in the textile industry. Our goal is to show the changes of colours in time to give the interior its essential function; the décor of human being.   Sitting at the crossroads of expertise and creativity, the Living Colours project was set up by Avans University of Applied Sciences (research and education), buroBELÉN (art direction) and a number of businesses and designers.     Credits: Art-direction: buroBELÉN Concept and Design: buroBELÉN Partners: AVANS Hogescholen, RUBIA 100% Natural Colours, RIGO verffabriek, Cottonmix, FEBRIK, Textiellab, Amsterdams Grafisch Atelier, Naan Rijks / Painting Plants, Tinctoria  Exhibition Design: Jantien Roozenburg Photography: Jantien Roozenburg   Special thanks to: SIA RAAK Masureel  

THOMASKERK

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interior concept and design for Thomaskerk more info
 

 

 

 

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Client: Thomaskerk   Year: 2015   The Thomaskerk is build in 1966 and designed by Karel Sijmons. He succeeded to create a very sensitive and symbolic church hall. BELÉN felt a great affection for his material-use with beautiful textures and earthy colours. The big entry of the church was good in the basis left behind. The acoustics were very unpleasant and it felt cold even when it was warm. It was the task for BELÉN to create a space with a soul. An atmosphere where you feel comfortable immediately and where you want to stay. A change from a passage to a place to be and feel. BELÉN treated the monumental walls with Cottonmix in a way that the specially designed structure is still visible but the appearance became much more soft and sound-absorbing. They now also relate to the walls in the church hall. The beautifully integrated big Wooden Textiles mural became the most special part of the space. It covers a wall from 8m to 4,5 meters. The stitches suggest a horizon. Because of this striking composition you tend to look into the distance instead of being stopped by a vertical border. Subtle movements make the space breath. The closer you come the more details appear. The drawing of the splittable table is one piece. This big gesture refers to the 'last supper table' in the church hall. Only this one is a bit less sacred so obliged to be used! The entry became the 'living room' of the church. Ready to gather, to dinner, to review or just to be.   Credits: Concept and Design: buroBELÉN Execution: Cottonmix, Caroline Ruigrok, Yeelen Tavilla, Jan-Martin Caminada   Photography: Winter Vandenbrink

Frame publication

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volvuntur

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presentation Volvo during DDW
 

a prospective commissioned by VOLVO
 

an Aerographite Volvo cleans the air while driving
 

opalescent Airloy provides you from a 360° view
 

copper Airloy will slowly change colour depending where you drive your car
 

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Client: Volvo Year: 2014     In the near future we will not drive our own car anymore but we will be driven by technology in shared vehicles. Car-accidents become history. As safety doesn’t have to be expressed by material we can search for new functions within the car-body. BELÉN introduces Airloy. Airloy is a very strong material which is for 99,7% air and for 0,3% a matter of choice. A choice for graphite will filter the air along your journey, where a choice for copper makes the car color to reflect the weather and its habitat. Imagine revolutionary light weight cars that are not only safe with a neutral footprint, they are even cleaning the environment. We, our VOLVO’s and our environment become one story.     Credits: Concept and Design: buroBELÉN Impressions: buroBELÉN Editing: Tjitske Hemkes  Photography: Lisa Klapper

Wooden textiles 2.0

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without stitch, natural
 

black zig-zag stitch, natural.
 

diamond stitch, tanine more info
 

detail of diamond stitch, tanine
 

salmon diamond stitch, natural
 

diamond stitch, rubia
 

diamond stitch, indigo
 

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Year: 2014 Material: Paper Mulberry wood and silk     WOODEN TEXTILES  A range of fabrics which show the fascinating qualities of this material and its different applications. The presented wooden fabrics differ in thickness, type of threads and natural dyed colour. A collection which will only continue to expand. By showing these qualities, the collection adds a new material to the libraries of interior architects and designers.           TAPA-MAKING  The basis for this ancient handicraft is the cambium of the paper mulberry tree, a thin layer of fibers between the bark and the wood of the tree. After harvesting the tree, Tongan women soak the cambium to beat the fibers to small cloths. In this process, they only use hardwood tools and a minimal amount of water. Then, they glue different cloths together using the starch of potatoes. This way they create tapa, a soft and flexible wooden cloth which Tongans use for rituals like weddings and funerals.          ENRICHMENT These wooden cloths have a fascinating beauty but lack the practical qualities needed for contemporary use. That is why buroBELÉN enriches these wooden cloths through industrial European techniques of textile processing. First, she embroideres wooden cloths with threads of silk from the mulberry silkworm, which eats the leaves of the tree. This treatment gives the wooden cloths the firmness of textile. Then, they are washed to dissolve the adhesive starch. Finally, there is the possibility to dye them with natural colours and they are given a finishing touch. In this process, ancient craft and modern industry come together to give this new material the right textile qualities for contemporary use.         SUSTAINABLE SYNTHESIS Apart from adding a new type of esthetics to interiors, buroBELÉN also promotes values of cultural diversity and sustainability. This means that each textile contributes to the conservation of the acient handicraft in Tonga, while simultaneously stimulating local economy in the Pacific Ocean. Also, WOODEN TEXTILES offer a sustainable alternative to industrial textiles because of its clean production process.               Credits: Concept and Design: buroBELÉN Development: buroBELÉN, women of Tonga, Union AG, Textiellab Photography: buroBELÉN        Special thanks to: Stichting DOEN Bruno Ninaber SPBD Merel Godrie

Wooden Textiles process

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Wooden Cover

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Year: 2014 Material: Paper Mulberry wood, silk stitches, silk rope Size: available on request      The cover of this couch expresses the unique character of the material, Wooden Textiles. For instance its  inclination to hold a half standing, half falling posture which BELÉN uses to engulf the sofa in a wooden  cloud. A heavy rope holds the fabric together and the knot forms a welcome detail in this amorphous pile of  fabric. BELÉN has chosen to let the fabric freely show its character. At the same time, Wooden Textiles emphasizes  the depth of the couch by the course of the embroidering. There is chosen to thicken the fabric on the spots  where it is used most. In this way, BELÉN shows the new role for Wooden Textiles in upholstery for furniture. From  being a solid servant to structure, wood becomes a curious and charming actor, more and more suited for  interior design.           Credits: Concept and Design: buroBELÉN Photo: Guus Schoth

BLUERED

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blankets in collaboration with Tinctoria.nl more info
 

 

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Year: 2013   Material: silk/viscose velvet, dyed with indigo and madder Size: 220cm x 220cm / 330cm x 330cm       A series of interior surfaces. 5 plaids represent blue and red at the same time. By dying velvet with plant dyes, every dye reacts different on the specific materials. Indigo (blue) prefers viscose while madder (red) likes the silk. Using these characteristics, magical effects appear. A very exciting product is created through a small collaboration with nature.         Credits: Concept and Design: buroBELÉN in collaboration with Tinctoria.nl    Development: Tinctoria.nl Production: Tinctoria.nl Photography: buroBELÉN

Combed Cotton

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cotton is very soft and fluffy.

 

by combing the weaving, softness appears.

 

 

blankets commissioned by Textiellab Tilburg more info
 

 

 

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Client: Textiellab Tilburg Year: 2012   Material: cotton, dyed with madder and reseda Size: 200cm x 220cm   Highlighting the industrial heritage of the renowned AaBe woolen blankets that used to be produced in The Netherlands, Combed Cotton is a series of blankets with faded patterns and color blends. A new type of cotton yarn is developed with Rubia Natural Colors and woven into a cloth resulting in a fabric that can be combed, by doing so the fibers of the yarns expand in such a way that a highly tender texture appears. The soft blankets act as comfort creators in domestic space.                         Credits: Concept and Design: buroBELÉN Development: Textiellab, Rubia Natural Colours, Masureel Production: Textiellab Text: Jules van den Langenberg   Product photography: May Heek     Interior photography: buroBELÉN     

Objects looking for content

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EXHIBITION DESIGN for Georg Jensen more info
 

 

 

 

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Client: Georg Jensen Year: 2014       Aldo Bakker's products are functional and abstract at the same time. By surrounding them by their most common content, their function becomes clear. At the same time this content forms a landscape/background for their abstract character. It gives a suggestion what the products could feel/look like when they are not in use.               Credits: Concept and Design: buroBELÉN Space: Rossana Orlandi, Milano Photography: Filippo Bamberghi

Forbo Flooring Linoleum

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Colour collection for 'The unexpected nature of linoleum'. more info
 

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Client: Forbo Flooring   Year: 2010   Linoleum is a natural product. But customers are not aware of that. To highlight the natural aspect of the product the special collection got the name 'The unexpected nature of linoleum'. The colour inspiration comes from very unexpected sites of earth's rich nature. A collection with a lot of tension in depth is the result. We played with minimal lightness- and tone-differences so a magical effect appears.   Credits: Concept and Design: buroBELÉN under Forbo Flooring  

Falling Rocks

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Rosequartz

silk velvet, spheres, 130cm x 110cm x 40cm more info
 

Onyx

viscose velvet, spheres, 80cm x 50cm x 35cm
 

Quartzite

PUfabric, spheres, 110cm x 90cm x 35cm
 

Rosequartz

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Year: 2011 Material: stone, textile, microspheres Size: varying from 50cm x 50cm x 35cm (30kg) to 130cm x 110cm x 40cm (250kg)   Falling Rocks is a series of tables that suit the contemporary landscaped interior. These sculptural pieces of furniture are made out of soft, textile bases on which hard, stone slabs seem to have fallen from the sky. A pliable volume of fabric embraces the  rough edged stone with its polished tabletop surface. Various tactilities meet and  form a strong charactered object.               Credits: Concept and Design: buroBELÉN Text: Jules van den Langenberg Photography: May Heek 

Creatures, studies for existence

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press photos
 

unlimited editions

 

unlimited editions

 

unlimited editions

 

unlimited editions

 

Exhibition design for Villa Noailles more info
 

limited editions

 

limited editions

 

limited editions

 

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Client: Villa Noailles, Hyeres (France) Year: 2010         CREATURES, STUDIES FOR EXISTENCE. A solo exhibition of Aldo Bakker     The aim of the exhibit was to highlight the objects as if they have characters of their own and interact with their counterparts. The setting was the swimming pool and ancient squash court of the modernist Villa Noailles in the southeast of France. The work was divided over the two spaces, showing limited editions in the swimming pool and unlimited editions in the squash court.         Submerged in the swimming pool The light that is cast through the glass roof creates a slightly discomforting atmosphere, which is extended in the indistinct color of the pedestals and plinths. The space and objects on display are in agreement with their surroundings and form their own habitat. The heat and humidity inside add to the unease, but tropical plants, flamenco's, beetles - even the sound of live crickets - endorse the damp thick air. Their presence relates to the animal characteristics of the objects that are on display. Images of animals, postures and ruins are mounted on the wall and show the origins of the outlines that characterize Aldo's work. Objects in this space relate to either itself, its' content or their direct neighbor. The base of the 'Soy Pourer' is surrounded with a puddle of soy sauce, mocking its very precise servings of soy sauce. Next to Aldo's 'Salt Cellar' lies a huge pile of salt, more than the tiny vessel can contain. While disputing the functionality of designs that master their purpose to the utmost, it points to their existence as an autonomous form. Does this object even need its' function to constitute existence?         Submerged in the squash court Upon descending into the space, the sizes and heights of display tables is hard to assess. A closer look reveals their three different heights, all referring to the use of tableware. Table tops with bar height, the height of a kitchen counter of plain dinner table in various grey tones that mimic the color of the surrounding walls to create a distorted view. The small differences between the greys distort the perception of depth and space to shift the focus of the visitor towards intuition and to make the space feel bigger. An unlimited edition of work is grouped on each table. Each herd of objects are placed on their own tabletop island, which emphasizes their animal or human traits. A group of 'Watering Cans' look like a herd of oxen with copper horns and the Vinegar Flasks seem to be a procession of Muslim women. Some of the articles have been used and contain oil or milk, the content has an effect on the color of the material's surface. The products are shown in use on wall mounted posters, to show how to hold and use them. The shape often outlines the way to use Aldo's designs, conversely, the form was derived from the way it is set out to be used.                 Credits: Concept and Design: buroBELÉN in collaboration with Emilie Pallard Production: Villa Noailles Text: Emeline Cosijnse         Photography: BELÉN  

Bodycloth

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Scarf commissioned by CHP...? more info
 

 

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Client: CHP...?  Material: printed silk  Size: 180cm x 114cm     Credits: Photography: buroBELÉN

TuTu

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TuTu pink more info
 

 

 

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Year: 2010 Material: Wooden Textiles, abachi, foam Size: 55cm x 38cm x 33cm Available on request     Credits: Photography: Erik en Petra Hesmerg Photography Museum van Loon: buroBELÉN

Wooden Textiles 1.0

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Year: 2010     Material: Paper Mulberry wood + different materials   Within the project buroBELÉN explores the unique character of a new type of material. The basis for each wooden textile is tapa, a wooden cloth produced through an ancient and sustainable handicraft in Tonga. BuroBELÉN did research on its visual qualities combining it with different techniques.      Credits: Concept and Design: buroBELÉN Development: buroBELÉN, women of Tonga, Textiellab Photography: buroBELÉN    

mirrors

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Closed
 

Opened
 

100% silver, 15cm x 12cm x 1cm more info
 

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Year: 2006 Material: gold, silver, urushi, porcelain, black marble Sizes: vary from 5cm x 3,5cm x 0,7cm to 15cm x 12cm x 1cm   MIRRORS represent the reflective character of each material.        Credits: Concept and Design: buroBELÉN Photography: buroBELÉN